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October 2021

Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

Post-surgical Care For Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are nails whose edges that have grown into the surrounding skin. This may cause the area to become red, swollen, tender, and painful, and puts you at an increased risk of getting an infection. In severe cases, an ingrown toenail may need to be surgically removed. Following a surgery for ingrown toenails, you should rest and elevate the affected foot for 12 to 24 hours. Over the counter medications can be used to manage pain. Two days after your surgery, you can begin to soak your foot in warm, soapy water several times a day. Following the soak, apply an antibiotic ointment and cover the area with a clean bandage. For more information about treatments for ingrown toenails, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Foot & Ankle Specialists, PA. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Stuart and Jupiter, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 13 October 2021 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

Abnormal Gaits

An abnormal gait is a dysfunctional walking pattern. It typically occurs due to biomechanical problems win the feet and ankles. In a normal gait, the feet both spend roughly an equal amount of time in contact with the ground. Many patients complain of a painful (antalgic) gait. This type of gait is usually due to a foot or ankle injury. The patient avoids bearing weight on the injured foot, resulting in an altered gait with shorter strides and an inequality in the amount of time each foot spends in contact with the ground (with the injured foot on the ground less). A high steppage gait is a walking pattern characterized by bending the knee more than is normal while walking. Patients do this to compensate for weak anterior compartment muscles, which can cause their foot to drop or slap onto the ground. If you have an abnormal gait, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist for diagnosis and treatment. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Foot & Ankle Specialists, PA. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Stuart and Jupiter, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

Why Foot Wounds Heal Slowly in Diabetics

All foot wounds are serious wounds if you have diabetes. This is because diabetic wounds tend to heal slowly and poorly due to the variety of health complications caused by diabetes. The elevated glucose levels characteristic of diabetes can stiffen the arteries, narrow the blood vessels, and damage the nerves that supply the lower limbs. This can lead to wounds that have a limited blood supply and are difficult to detect because of impaired pain signaling from the feet to the rest of the body. Without enough oxygen and nutrients traveling to the injured area via the bloodstream, the wound cannot heal properly. This creates a high risk of infection, which can be made worse by immune system insufficiency. If you have diabetes, it is very important that you inspect your feet daily for any changes or abnormalities. If you notice that something is wrong, please seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible. Early detection and treatment is the key in preventing complications from diabetic foot wounds. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Advanced Foot & Ankle Specialists, PA. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Stuart and Jupiter, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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